Sea ice in the northern North Atlantic through the Holocene: Evidence from ice cores and marine sediment records

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Niccolo Maffezzoli
  • Bjorg Risebrobakken
  • Martin W. Miles
  • Paul Vallelonga
  • Sarah M. P. Berben
  • Federico Scoto
  • Ross Edwards
  • Kjær, Helle Astrid
  • Henrik Sadatzki
  • Alfonso Saiz-Lopez
  • Clara Turetta
  • Carlo Barbante
  • Vinther, Bo Møllesøe
  • Andrea Spolaor

Sea ice plays a pivotal role in Earth's climate and its past reconstruction is crucial to investigate the connections and feedbacks with the other components of the climate system. Among the available archives that store information of past sea ice are marine and ice cores. Recent studies on the IP 25 biomarker extracted from marine sediments has shown great skill to infer past changes of Arctic sea ice. In ice matrixes, sodium, bromine and iodine have shown potential to store the fingerprint of sea ice presence. The development of an unambiguous sea ice proxy from ice cores, however, has proven to be a challenging task especially in the Arctic realm.

In this work we analyze the sodium, bromine and iodine records in the RECAP ice core, coastal eastern Greenland, to investigate the sea ice variability in the northern North Atlantic Ocean through the last 11,000 years of the current interglacial, i.e. the Holocene. We compare the RECAP records with marine sea ice proxy records available from the northern North Atlantic.

We suggest that RECAP sodium concentrations can be associated with variability of sea ice extent, while the bromine-to-sodium ratios and iodine are associated respectively with seasonal sea ice and bioproductivity from open ocean and fresh sea ice surfaces.

According to our interpretation, we find that sea ice was at its lowest extent and seasonal in nature during the early Holocene in all regions of the North Atlantic. Increasing sea ice signals are seen from ca. 8-9 ka b2k, in line with long-term Holocene cooling. The increasing sea ice trend appears uninterrupted in the Fram Strait and North Iceland while reaching a maximum ca. 5 ka b2k in the East Greenland region. Sea ice modifications during the last 5000 years display great variability in East Greenland with intermediate conditions between the early and mid Holocene, possibly associated with local fjord dynamics. The last sea ice maximum was reached across all regions 1000 years b2k. (C) 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Article number107249
JournalQuaternary Science Reviews
Volume273
Number of pages17
ISSN0277-3791
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Nov 2021

    Research areas

  • Sea ice, Holocene, North Atlantic ocean, Greenland, Ice cores, Marine sediment cores, Renland, Sodium, Bromine, Iodine, IP25, HIGH-RESOLUTION RECORD, SALT AEROSOL, ARCTIC-OCEAN, FRAM STRAIT, ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION, SURFACE TEMPERATURES, NORDIC SEAS, IODINE EMISSIONS, MOLECULAR-IODINE, ICELANDIC SHELF

ID: 287064067