Gravitational Waves Astrophysics Group

The research interests at the Gravitational Waves Astrophysics Group at the Niels Bohr International Academy and the Niels Bohr Institute span a broad variety of topics in astrophysical dynamics and gravitational wave astrophysics. 
The Theoretical Astrophysics Group at the Niels Bohr Institute The Theoretical Astrophysics Group at the Niels Bohr Institute The Theoretical Astrophysics Group at the Niels Bohr Institute The Theoretical Astrophysics Group at the Niels Bohr Institute

The Theoretical Waves Astrophysics Group at the Niels Bohr International Academy strives for a comprehensive approach to astrophysics. Current research areas encompass astrophysical fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics, gravitational wave astrophysics, protoplanetary disks and planet formation, and tidal disruption events.

Research areas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The detection of gravitational waves ignited one of the most exciting revolutions in modern science by opening up a new window into our Universe.

To date, more than a dozen mergers of black holes in binary systems have been observed providing unique insight into their physical properties, such as mass and spin, that are impossible to infer otherwise.

A central theme in our research is to address the question "How do black hole binaries merge?"

 

 

 

Our understanding of protoplanetary disks has been revolutionized by the Atacama Large Millimeter-Array (ALMA). Among its most fascinating discoveries, recent observations have revealed large-scale features such as gaps and rings, spiral patterns and even large concentrations of dust.

Understanding the connection between the large-scale disk features that result from the interaction between the forming planets and the disk is crucial not only for inferring the presence of planets but also for unraveling the crucial processes that shape planet formation. A central theme in our research is to understand dynamical processes in dusty protoplanetary disks.

 

 

If a star wanders too close to a supermassive black hole, the tidal forces of the black hole tear the star apart in a so-called tidal disruption event, or TDE.

Afterwards, the stellar debris form a thin and elongated stream of gas that revolves around the black hole before falling back towards the disruption site. The stellar material then suddenly fuels the compact object producing a bright flare that makes TDEs unique probes of otherwise quiescent galactic nuclei.

A central theme in our research is to understand TDEs observational signatures.

 

 

Johan Georg Mulvad Samsing
Niels Bohr International Academy
Niels Bohr Institute
Blegdamsvej 17, 2100
Copenhagen, Denmark
Email: jsamsing@nbi.ku.dk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group leader

Johan Georg Mulvad Samsing
Niels Bohr International Academy
Niels Bohr Institute
Blegdamsvej 17, 2100
Copenhagen, Denmark
Email: jsamsing@nbi.ku.dk

Staff

Name Title Phone E-mail
Søg i Name Søg i Title Søg i Phone
Fabj, Gaia PhD Fellow +4535328883 E-mail
Hendriks, Kai Sebastian Paul PhD Fellow +4535329778 E-mail
O'Neill, David William PhD Fellow +4535328489 E-mail
Samsing, Johan Georg Mulvad Assistant Professor +4535320370 E-mail
Trani, Alessandro Alberto Postdoc +4535328462 E-mail

External staff & students

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